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Three Lives

Barry Forward

It began in 1953, called up for National Service and choosing the Navy, I was offered Russian spy or seaman and chose the latter

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ISBN : 978-1-84897-978-9
Published : 25/01/2018
Pages : 396
Size : 205x140mm
Imprint : Olympia Publishers


Barry Forward

Call-up for National Service in 1953 offered the Navy. Initially training at sea on an aircraft-carrier, then frigate, where an police ex-cadet on board inspired me to join. 

Soon I was at large in Soho and the West End, Plaistow, Wanstead, Holloway, City Road, Leman Street and secondment to the LSE, reading Economics.

After Holborn I met my second wife, marrying in 1980, and starting again with two daughters and a lively criminal practice in wig and gown. 

My last client felt reminded of her grandfather. Enough! We decided it was time to cut stress and write about my lives.

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About Book

It began in 1953, called up for National Service and choosing the Navy, I was offered Russian spy or seaman and chose the latter: father was displeased. A police ex- cadet joined the ship and proved my inspiration. After swabbing decks, I found myself directing traffic at Oxford Circus and an arresting figure in a very wicked Soho. In promotion class, the Commandant decided to pick on me. I retaliated by calling him a f...ing old bastard. 

At police college, given the chance of a university place, selected the LSE. At a prisoners' visit for Criminology I was about to get thumped when: "You charged me once... You was a f...ing gent guv'nor." Discussion resumed. Whew!

My former police chief retired, became a lawyer and in court was mightily impressive. Inspired again, meant more study but ended in wig, gown and a criminal practice. Memories included, "Get me locked up, Mr Forward, I'm dangerous.", "Thanks, (and a handshake) for the way you prosecuted me," when convicted of baggage-handling. Druid chiefs and a Wizard...a roulette table in court...lastly, struck in the face in my client's cell by his psychiatric report!

Was my decision in 1953 right? A matter for the jury.

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