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Pigs Of The Fields Homo Insapiens

Michael Elton

In this book, Michael Elton first gives a dramatic account of the sometimes horrifying depths of his unconscious mind. These emerged into consciousness during a quite exceptional psychoanalysis involving the use of powerful drugs.

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ISBN : 978-1-84897-706-8
Published : 01/12/2016
Pages : 81
Size : 205x140mm
Imprint : Olympia Publishers


Michael Elton

Educated at Peter Symonds School and Brasenose College, Oxford, where his academic achievements were remarkably distinguished, Michael Elton went on to qualify as a solicitor. After a career in local government, he became Chief Executive of the Association of British Travel Agents (ABTA) for sixteen years and was Director General of the National Association of Pension Funds (NAPF) for eight years.

He was a Companion of the Chartered Management Institute and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts.

Now retired, he resides in Winchester with his wife, Isabel.

His interests include sport (he played squash for Hampshire) and he is passionately devoted to opera and Lieder. He and Isabel have sung in first-class choirs for most of their adult lives and they both enjoy playing bridge.

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About Book

In this book, Michael Elton first gives a dramatic account of the sometimes horrifying depths of his unconscious mind. These emerged into consciousness during a quite exceptional psychoanalysis involving the use of powerful drugs. In his later life, he occasionally became aware of other features of his unconscious mind, quite recently as a result of astonishing visions relating to humanity as a whole and Christians in particular.

He goes on to discuss the other main features of the human mind with a clarity and absence of jargon untypical of professionals, such as psychologists, philosophers and neuroscientists. His discussion is therefore unusually accessible to laymen in these disciplines.

He concludes with a short, light-hearted but, paradoxically, important comparison between humans and pigs in fields near his home.

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